13-foot high waves could hit Chicago shores Thursday

A flood advisory — set from 4 a.m. Thursday to 11 a.m. Friday — stretches from southern Wisconsin to northwest Indiana.

SHARE 13-foot high waves could hit Chicago shores Thursday
Waves from Lake Michigan crash against the lakefront trail near Oak Street Beach.

Waves from Lake Michigan crash against the lakefront trail near Oak Street Beach.

Sun-Times file photo

Thirteen-foot high waves could crash along the shores of Lake Michigan on Thursday, according to a flood advisory from the National Weather Service.

The advisory — set from 4 a.m. Thursday to 11 a.m. Friday — stretches from southern Wisconsin to northwest Indiana.

Large waves combined with high lake levels could flood lakeshore parks, trails, parking lots and other low-lying areas, the weather service warned.

Waves between 8 and 13 feet high were expected.

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National Weather Service

Wednesday night, rain will hit the Chicago area and continue until early Thursday afternoon, according to the weather service.

Thursday’s forecast calls for a high temperature of 39 degrees, with northeast winds of 25 to 30 mph and gusts up to 35 mph. Thursday night will be blustery with a low near 30 degrees, forecasters said.

But Chicago will catch a break Friday as the sun comes out and temperatures reach 42 degrees. Saturday was expected to be clear as well, with a high of 54 degrees. Sunday could see a high temperature of 63 degrees.

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