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Feds charge 2 more Illinoisans in U.S. Capitol breach as massive investigation continues

Douglas K. Wangler allegedly told one witness, “if walking around and singing some patriotic songs is a crime then I guess I am guilty.”

Federal authorities say this image depicts Douglas K. Wangler of Oakwood, Ill., inside the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021.
Federal authorities say this image depicts Douglas K. Wangler of Oakwood, Ill., inside the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021.
U.S. District Court records

Federal prosecutors have charged two more Illinoisans with entering the U.S. Capitol during the Jan. 6 Electoral College vote count, including one who allegedly later said, “If walking around and singing some patriotic songs is a crime, then I guess I am guilty.”

Douglas K. Wangler and Bruce J. Harrison are each charged with knowingly entering or remaining in a restricted building, disorderly and disruptive conduct, disorderly conduct in a Capitol building, and parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building.

They are at least the seventh and eighth individuals from Illinois to be charged in the Capitol breach, which has so far led to charges against hundreds of individuals. Federal prosecutors have said it will likely amount to one of the largest criminal investigations in U.S. history.

Wangler and Harrison each had an initial appearance Friday in federal court in Urbana and were ordered released, court records show. A criminal complaint filed against the men says Wangler lives in the village of Oakwood, near Danville. A residence for Harrison is not listed.

Federal authorities say this image depicts Bruce J. Harrison inside the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021.
Federal authorities say this image depicts Bruce J. Harrison inside the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021.
U.S. District Court records

An attorney for the pair did not immediately comment. The two men could not be reached.

A tip to law enforcement first led the feds to Wangler, court records show. Documents allege that Wangler can be seen in an 11-second video standing in the Capitol Crypt pumping his right fist in the air and chanting, “U.S.A.”

An FBI agent also viewed surveillance footage from the Capitol, spotting Wangler with Harrison, who later told authorities he wore a New England Patriots jacket because of its patriotic colors.

Other videos allegedly showed Wangler and Harrison entering and exiting the Capitol, but the agent wrote that “none of the videos I reviewed depict Wangler or Harrison damaging property or participating in other violent acts.”

A witness allegedly told the FBI agent that Wangler had said he walked around the Capitol to take a “tour” and then left. That witness also alleged Wangler said something like, “If walking around and singing some patriotic songs is a crime, then I guess I am guilty.” Harrison allegedly told the same witness he was concerned the FBI was looking for him.

FBI agents interviewed Wangler and Harrison separately at their attorney’s office in Urbana on April 15, court records show. The men said they made last-minute plans to attend a rally by then-President Donald Trump on Jan. 6, traveling to Washington, D.C., in Harrison’s vehicle.

During the president’s speech, Wangler said he heard a loud commotion from the direction of the Capitol. Harrison said he heard several loud bangs that sounded like a “Civil War re-enactment.”

The men said they saw a violent crowd at the Capitol. They allegedly said they decided to walk to another side of the Capitol to get away from the violence, and Wangler claimed he saw a man pounding on a window and told the man to “knock that sh— off.”

The pair allegedly said they eventually saw some wide-open doors in which people were freely going in, including what Wangler said appeared to be family groups. As they walked in, Harrison said he saw windows had been broken and glass had been scattered on the ground.

Wangler told the FBI he asked an officer inside the building if they were going to get in trouble for being inside. He said the officer shrugged and said something like, “It doesn’t matter now.”