Renowned scholar and cardiac expert to lead University of Chicago Medicine

Mark Anderson will oversee medical and biological research, education, care delivery and community engagement for UChicago Medicine, the Division of the Biological Sciences and the Pritzker School of Medicine.

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The University of Chicago Medicine located at 5841 S. Maryland, in the Hyde Park neighborhood.

The University of Chicago Medicine in the Hyde Park neighborhood.

Tyler LaRiviere/Sun-Times file

The University of Chicago Medicine has named Mark Anderson, a renowned cardiac expert and scholar, as its newest executive vice president for medical affairs, dean of the Division of the Biological Sciences and dean of the Pritzker School of Medicine.

Paul Alivisatos, president of the University of Chicago, said Anderson is an “extraordinarily talented and globally respected medical leader” and will bring an ambitious agenda while preparing the next generation of scholars.

“Mark is in a strong position to lead growth of our clinical enterprise and will have a significant focus on the expansion of UCM’s regional health system,” Alivisatos said in a statement.

Anderson is coming to UChicago Medicine from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, where he is the director of the Department of Medicine, the William Osler Professor of Medicine and physician-in-chief of The John Hopkins Hospital. He’s been at Johns Hopkins since 2014.

Before that, he led the Cardiovascular Research Center and the Department of Medicine at the University of Iowa and served on the medical faculty at Vanderbilt University, where he directed educational and clinical programs.

“As we got to know Mark, it became clear that he is the right partner to collaborate across the university and lead the many facets of the University of Chicago Medicine and the Division of the Biological Sciences,” Provost Ka Yee C. Lee said in a statement. “We extend to him a warm welcome to our intellectual community.”

Anderson will look to lead the medical and biological research, education, care delivery and community engagement for UChicago Medicine, the Division of the Biological Sciences and the Pritzker School of Medicine. One important aspect of his duties will be to enhance UChicago Medicine’s community health, health equity and access to care on the South Side.

He will assume the role on Oct. 1.

“I am thrilled and humbled to join the University of Chicago community and look forward to the opportunity to work across the university and the South Side to promote biomedical discovery, education and health,” Anderson said.

During Anderson’s time at John Hopkins, he oversaw more than 700 full-time faculty members and clinicians across 18 academic divisions and had a research portfolio of more than $200 million last year.

“The University of Chicago Medicine is in a distinctive position to lead the search for discoveries, to train brilliant and compassionate caregivers, and to provide the highest level of medical care and service to our communities,” said Brien O’Brien, chair of the University of Chicago Medical Center Board of Trustees. “We are delighted that Mark Anderson will bring his inspired leadership and deep experience to this mission.”

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