Bears’ Eddie Jackson: Foot injury should be fine by spring practice

Bears safety Eddie Jackson seems to have avoided the worst.

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Bears safety Eddie Jackson signs autographs for volunteers Monday at the Greater Chicago Food Depository.

Bears safety Eddie Jackson signs autographs for volunteers Monday at the Greater Chicago Food Depository.

Bears safety Eddie Jackson seems to have avoided the worst.

He left the field Nov. 27 against the Jets with a Lisfranc injury to his left foot. That’s a scary diagnosis — the injury has cost some players their careers — but Jackson learned last week he won’t need surgery.

“That was a great feeling. …” he said. “I’m glad I was able to avoid the needle.”

Jackson, safety Jaquan Brisker and linebacker Sterling Weatherford went to the Greater Chicago Food Depository on Monday. In conjunction with Campbell’s Chunky Soup, Jackson donated 100,000 meals to the food depository, which works with partners throughout Chicago to distribute food to the needy.

Jackson didn’t think his injury was serious at first — he told trainer Andre Tucker to give him an injection and let him return. He learned just how serious a Lisfranc injury could be when he went to the locker room and tried to stand on his toes. He couldn’t.

A Lisfranc injury occurs when a player suffers damage to bone and ligaments in his or her midfoot. Jackson said he only had small damage.

Jackson, whose left foot remains immobilized, is due for an MRI on Dec. 30 or 31. He said he’s not sure when he’ll be back to normal. He’s taking his recovery slow but said the injury shouldn’t keep him from participating in offseason activities this spring.

“(Doctors} said it’s all about my body, how I heal,” he said.

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