Illinois reports 14 more coronavirus deaths, lowest tally in months

The state also announced 738 new COVID-19 cases, bringing its total to 142,461.

SHARE Illinois reports 14 more coronavirus deaths, lowest tally in months
A phlebotomist draws blood for a coronavirus antibody test in May in the parking lot of St. Rosalie Catholic Parish in Harwood Heights.

A phlebotomist draws blood for a coronavirus antibody test in May in the parking lot of St. Rosalie Catholic Parish in Harwood Heights.

Ashlee Rezin Garcia/Sun-Times

Illinois reported its fewest number of COVID-19 deaths in three months for the second day in a row as the state’s reopening is underway.

The Illinois Department of Public Health reported an additional 14 COVID-caused deaths on Monday bringing the state’s death toll to 6,902. The victims lived in Cook County, DuPage County and Perry County and were between the ages of 30 and 90 years old.

It’s the fewest number of deaths the state has registered since March 30, when just eight were recorded. This is also the sixth consecutive day of falling COVID-19 deaths — just 15 deaths were recorded Sunday — as the state continues Phase 4 of reopening.

The state also announced 738 new COVID-19 cases, bringing the state’s total to 142,461. Those newly confirmed cases come from 26,918 tests that were conducted over the last 24 hours. The state’s positivity rate over the last week is 2.7%.

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The month of June has only seen two days of more than 1,000 new COVID-19 cases. The increasingly low days come as other states across the country are seeing a surge of COVID-19 cases — particularly in Texas and Florida, where they are registering over 5,000 new cases daily.

The highest number of COVID-19 cases Illinois reported in a single day was just over 4,000 on May 12.

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