Woman carjacked in South Shore with children, 4 and 6, still in vehicle

No injuries were reported and the children were safely reunited with their family, police said.

SHARE Woman carjacked in South Shore with children, 4 and 6, still in vehicle
A teen boy was fatally shot Aug. 14, 2022, in the Golden Gate neighborhood.

A woman was carjacked with her children in the vehicle Feb. 27, 2021, in South Shore.

Sun-Times file photo

A woman’s car was stolen Saturday in South Shore while her children were still in the vehicle.

Someone jumped into the woman’s Chevrolet Malibu after she left her keys inside about 5:30 p.m. in the 7500 block of South Yates Boulevard, Chicago police said.

The carjacker drove off with a 4-year-old boy and 6-year-old girl still in the car, but ditched the Malibu nearby in the 7500 block of South Merrill Avenue, police said.

No injuries were reported and the children were safely reunited with their family, police said.

Earlier Saturday, an Albany Park woman was ordered held on $1 million bond in connection with a pair of carjackings on the Northwest Side, including one in which an 8-year-old boy had to jump out of a moving vehicle after it was stolen with him inside.

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