Former Vernon Hills deputy police chief indicted on theft charges

He allegedly pocketed $4,000 by abusing a state program designed to compensate police who spend extra time on traffic enforcement.

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A former Vernon Hills deputy police chief allegedly pocketed $4,000 by abusing a state program designed to compensate police who spend extra time on traffic enforcement.

Patrick Zimmerman was indicted on two felony counts of official misconduct and two misdemeanor theft counts in connection with the scheme, according to a statement from the Lake County state’s attorney’s office.

Zimmerman, who resigned in September 2020 when the department found discrepancies in his documentation, falsified records related to the Sustained Traffic Enforcement Program administered by the Illinois Department of Transportation, prosecutors said.

An internal investigation allegedly found that Zimmerman was paid over $4,000 based on false traffic citations he had written.

Although he falsified the tickets for the state program, the tickets were never submitted to drivers, prosecutors said.

Zimmerman remains free on $5,000 bail until his arraignment, which is scheduled for April 5 before Lake County Circuit Judge Mark Levitt.

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