Lifetime orders up sequel to ‘Surviving R. Kelly’ docu-series

“Surviving R. Kelly: The Aftermath,” a four-part series that includes interviews with new survivors and experts on the case.

SHARE Lifetime orders up sequel to ‘Surviving R. Kelly’ docu-series
In this June 26, 2019, file photo, R&B singer R. Kelly, center, arrives at the Leighton Criminal Court building for an arraignment on sex-related felonies in Chicago.

In this June 26, 2019, file photo, R&B singer R. Kelly, center, arrives at the Leighton Criminal Court building for an arraignment on sex-related felonies in Chicago.

AP

BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. — Lifetime is still invested in the R. Kelly case.

The network announced Tuesday that it has ordered “Surviving R. Kelly: The Aftermath,” a four-part series that includes interviews with new survivors and experts on the case.

“Surviving R. Kelly” was a six-part series that premiered last January. An estimated 12.8 million people watched the series, nominated for an Emmy, that revisited old allegations and brought new ones into the spotlight.

Kelly has been in custody since being indicted this month on charges in Chicago and New York. He’s accused of having sex with minors and trying to cover up the crimes. He maintains his innocence.

Lifetime will also produce “Surviving Jeffrey Epstein,” about the New York financier accused of sex crimes with minors and trafficking.

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