Lincoln Park Zoo to reopen March 5

The zoo’s auxiliary board is hosting a reopening celebration March 6 called Beers and Bears.

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The entrance to Lincoln Park Zoo

Lincoln Park Zoo will reopen to the public March 5 after closing in January because of the coronavirus pandemic.

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Lincoln Park Zoo plans to reopen to the public March 5 after closing two months ago because of the coronavirus pandemic.

The zoo closed voluntarily Jan. 4 because of the decrease in visitors during winter months and restrictions on indoor spaces.

The reopening weekend will be open by reservation only. Reservations can be made beginning at 4:30 p.m Feb. 28 through the zoo’s website, https://www.lpzoo.org/.

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Reservations will be required for as long as CDC guidelines set capacity limits, said Chris Jorgensen, the zoo’s guest services director. Zoo capacity will be based on outdoor spaces that are available on a given day.

Hand sanitizing stations and signs about mask wearing will be placed throughout the zoo. Intercom messages will be played every 15 minutes to remind visitors to remain socially distanced and keep masks on.

The Lincoln Park Zoo auxiliary board is hosting a reopening celebration March 6 called Beers and Bears. Tickets range in price from $15 to $120, which includes a virtual improv show with The Second City.

The zoo will reopen to members on Feb. 27-28.

The zoo closed in March 2020 when initial COVID-19 restrictions went into place and reopened in June with facial coverings and capacity restrictions.

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