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From brotherly love to 'Don't taze me, bro' for Phillies fan

A law enforcement officer chases down a fan that ran onto the field before the eighth inning in Philadelphia on Monday. Matt Slocum-AP

Philadelphia Phillies fans, notoriously, will boo anyone and anything. But one fan got a hearty cheer when the Phils took on the St. Louis Cardinals. All he had to do to earn a little love? Get the Taser.

An unnamed 17-year-old decided to jump the fence and pull a sprint across Citizens Bank Field, causing the usual Keystone Cop scene with security and police chasing him down. Until, that is, one of Philadelphia’s finest decide he’d had enough running and just tazed the kid.

As the underage fan went down in a heap, several Phillies placed gloves over their faces and appeared to be stifling laughter at the wild scene.

Police spokesman Lt. Frank Vanore told The Philadelphia Inquirer police internal affairs will open an investigation to determine if the firing “was proper use of the equipment.”

“This is the first time that a Taser gun has been used by Philadelphia police to apprehend a field jumper,” Phillies spokeswoman Bonnie Clark said in a statement to the Enquirer. “The Police Department is investigating this matter and The Phillies are discussing with them whether in future situations this is an appropriate use of force under these circumstances. That decision will be made public.”

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The fan will be charged with criminal trespass and related offenses, the team said. The Phillies did not release his name because he is a juvenile.

Adding insult to injury, the Phillies lost to the Cardinals, 6-3.

At least they never juiced Santa.

UPDATE:

Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey examined video of the arrest and felt the officer acted within department guidelines, which allow officers to use Tasers to arrest fleeing suspects, said police spokesman Lt. Frank Vanore. The department’s internal affairs unit is investigating, Vanore said.

The department is now reviewing whether its officers should be on the field wrangling runaway fans who aren’t threatening anyone, Vanore said.

“Should we be on the field at all? I think that’s what’s being looked at,” Vanore said. “I’m not sure we should be chasing people around the field.”

The police officer chased him for about 30 seconds before the stun gun probe hit the teenager, who stumbled forward, slid face-first on the grass and stayed down for about 30 seconds before standing up and walking off the field.