Interactive graphic: Pro Football Focus rates Alshon Jeffery, Julius Peppers

SHARE Interactive graphic: Pro Football Focus rates Alshon Jeffery, Julius Peppers

HOW IT WORKS:

Pro Football Focus, which nearly a third of the NFL subscribes to, has a complex grading process, looking at every player on every offensive, defensive and special-teams play. Plus or minus grades are given and are based around an average of 0, with each position graded slightly differently. If a player does something you normally would expect, then a score of 0 is given. Grades are given for plays that are reasonably considered to be better or worse than the average or expected play. For the final grade, player participation is factored in, using a normalization factor to set the average player in that facet of the game to 0.

Bears receiver Alshon Jeffery jettisoned himself into elite company in the league — fourth in receiving yards after Sunday’s games — with 12 catches for 249 yards and two touchdowns against the Minnesota Vikings. In PFF’s reviews, Jeffery, who now has 70 catches for 1,109 yards this season, had a season-best 5.1 rating on Sunday. He had success against any player assigned to stop him. Take a look:[iframe src=”//e.infogr.am/-4897113211918622″ width=”300″ height=”607″ scrolling=”no” frameborder=”0″]

Defensive end Julius Peppers had 2.5 sacks against the Vikings and it was good enough for his second-best grade of the season, according to PFF.[iframe src=”//e.infogr.am/-6783775710500777″ width=”300″ height=”453″ scrolling=”no” frameborder=”0″]

Compiled with Adam Jahns

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