Cubs trade DeJesus to Nationals

SHARE Cubs trade DeJesus to Nationals

The Cubs have traded outfielder David DeJesus to the Washington Nationals for a player to be named later in a waiver deal.

The Nationals are at Wrigley Field today to begin a four-game series.

The deal sends DeJesus, 33, and the Cubs leadoff man to the Nationals, who have had a disappointing season after reaching the playoffs last season with 98 victories.

As a corresponding roster move, the Cubs will activate outfielder Brian Bogusevic from the 15-day disabled list.

DeJesus batted .250 (71-for-284) with 19 doubles, six home runs and 27 RBI in 84 games with the Cubs this season.  He had a .330 on-base percentage and a .401 slugging percentage.

DeJesus joined the Cubs prior to the 2012 campaign and batted .263 (133-for-506) with 28 doubles, nine home runs and 50 RBI in 148 games, posting a .350 on-base percentage and a .403 slugging percentage.

Overall, DeJesus is a career .279 hitter (1,281-for-4,587) with 86 home runs and 513 RBI in 1,239 major league games with Kansas City (2003-2010), Oakland (2011) and the Cubs (2012-13).

His wife, Kim, is a Chicago area native.

Bogusevic, 29, is batting .261 (12-for-46) with three doubles and three RBI in 13 games with the Cubs this season.  He was placed on the 15-day disabled list on July 19 (retroactive to July 15) with a left hamstring strain.  Bogusevic completed a rehab assignment during which he hit .367 (11-for-30) with four doubles, one triple and five RBI in eight games with Rookie-level Mesa (seven games) and Class AAA Iowa (one game).


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