PHOTOS: On Thursday, a change of pace in Ferguson

SHARE PHOTOS: On Thursday, a change of pace in Ferguson

Alex Wroblewski, a freelance photographer working for the Sun-Times, was in Ferguson, Missouri, Thursday night. It was a decidedly different scene after to the Missouri Highway Patrol assumed law enforcement duties from local police. Instead of tear gas and Molotov cocktails,

By late afternoon, Highway Patrol Capt. Ron Johnson was walking down the street with a large group of protesters as they chanted “Hands up, don’t shoot,” a reference to witness accounts that described Brown as having his hands in the air when the officer kept firing. He planned to talk to the demonstrators throughout the night.

At one point, Johnson spoke to several young men wearing red bandanas around their necks and faces. After the discussion, one of the men reached out and embraced him.

Thousands of people in cities across the country turned out for a moment of silence honoring Brown. This was the scene in Chicago.

All photos by Alex Wroblewski/For Sun-Times Media.

Protesters stand in smoke caused by a car burning out its wheel.

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