Chicago police officer’s autopsy is pending results of COVID-19, other testing

The results of an autopsy performed Wednesday remained pending for Officer Titus Moore, who was found unresponsive inside a South Side home.

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Police officers and firefighters observe a procession near the Cook County medical examiner’s office on the Near West Side after Chicago police officer was found dead inside his home Nov. 24 on the South Side.

Police officers and firefighters observe a procession near the Cook County medical examiner’s office for Officer Titus Moore on Nov. 24.

Tyler LaRiviere/Sun-Times

An autopsy performed on a Chicago police officer is awaiting the completion of further testing, including a COVID-19 test.

Until those tests are completed, autopsy results will remain pending for Officer Titus Moore, who was found unresponsive inside a home Tuesday on the South Side, according to Natalia Derevyanny, a spokeswoman for the Cook County medical examiner’s office.

The 46-year-old field training officer was found by paramedics inside shortly before 11 a.m. in the 9400 block of South Wabash Avenue and pronounced dead at the scene. Police and fire spokespeople were unable to comment on the circumstances of his death.

More than 1,200 members have tested positive for COVID-19 in the Chicago Police Department, which employs 13,000 people. Three officers died of the virus in April: Sgt. Cliff Martin and officers Marco DiFranco and Ronald Newman.

On Tuesday, Police Supt. David Brown said: “It is with a heavy heart that the Chicago Police Department learned today that an active department member passed away. I ask that you keep his family in your prayers, and I offer my sincerest condolences to his loved ones and co-workers.”

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