1 dead, 17-year-old among 2 injured after crash in Humboldt Park

About 11:50 p.m., a car with four occupants was going west in the 3200 block of West Division Street when the driver lost control, striking an unoccupied parked car and a tree, police said.

SHARE 1 dead, 17-year-old among 2 injured after crash in Humboldt Park
A Chicago police SUV

A man died and a 17-year-old boy was among two injured in a crash Dec. 30, 2021 on the Northwest Side.

Sun-Times file

One person was dead and a 17-year-old boy among two others injured Thursday night after a crash in Humboldt Park on the Northwest Side.

About 11:50 p.m., a car with four occupants was going west in the 3200 block of West Division Street when the driver lost control, striking an unoccupied parked car and a tree, Chicago police said.

One of the passengers, an 18-year-old man, suffered body trauma and was taken to Stroger Hospital, where he died, police said. He was identified as Hilberto Sanchez by the Cook County medical examiner’s office.

A 17-year-old boy who was also a passenger in the car was taken to Illinois Masonic Medical Center with minor injuries, and was listed in good condition, officials said.

The driver of the car, a second 18-year-old man, was taken to Stroger with minor injuries, police said. He was listed in good condition, authorities said.

The fourth occupant, a woman, 18, was uninjured in the crash and refused medical treatment, police said.

Citations were pending.

The Latest
Bevy of low averages glares brightly in first weeks of season.
Too often, Natalie Moore writes, we think segregation is self-selection. It’s not. Instead, it’s the end result of a host of 20th century laws, policies, ideas and practices that deliberately shaped our region, a new WTTW documentary makes clear.
The four-time Olympic gold medalist revealed what was going through her mind in the 2020 Summer Olympics on an episode of the “Call Her Daddy” podcast posted on Wednesday.
We want to hear from diverse voices across the city.
The WLS National Barn Dance, which predated the Opry by two years, was first broadcast 100 years ago Friday, on April 19, 1924.