My heart breaks for Chicago Police Cmdr. Paul Bauer’s wife and daughter as they struggle to understand why their loved one is not coming home tonight.

My husband served the city of Chicago as a cop for 30 years. Not once did I ever worry that anything would ever happen to him. Maybe it was because I didn’t want to believe that anything could happen to him. Everyday, when a police officer leaves for work and says goodbye to his family, he doesn’t know — nor do they — whether he will come back alive.

Our whole city owes Cmdr. Bauer a debt of gratitude for his dedicated service. My tears are for his family. Thank you, Commander.

Deborah Jedynak, Belmont-Cragin

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I wanted to shout “be careful”

Last Friday, I was driving in downtown Chicago, picking up a client near City Hall. As I approached an intersection, I saw a police officer in dress blues walking in and around some winter slush near the stop light. He looked very important and I almost rolled down my window to tell him to be careful. We can’t have one of the city’s finest on the ground in the muck! Today, I think I recognized him again. He lost his life helping fellow officers apprehend a suspect.

Chicago will be less safe without you, Cmdr. Bauer. May you rest in peace.

Bob Grzesiak, Bolingbrook

Our prayers will hold you up

To the family of Cmdr. Paul Bauer:

You are in the hearts and prayers of so many of us tonight. Paul seemed like an amazing soul and he made a positive difference in the world. His smile and attitude brightened up the room. You feel that even just watching the TV coverage of his death.

I’ve sent a Catholic mass card to Cmdr. Bauer’s police station to let you know that daily masses will be said for him over the next five years. Stay strong, and when you feel your weakest, know that our prayers will hold you up.

Nyssa Garcia, Chicago

Bring back the death penality

As Chicago mourns the loss of Cmdr. Paul Bauer, we again are reminded of the financial burden to taxpayers for incarcerating the suspected shooter, a four-time felon, for the remainder of his life. He will be given free housing, three free meals a day and free healthcare for the remainder of his life — all on the taxpayers. Time to reinstate the death penalty.

Sean Herling, Chicago