CNN’s Christiane Amanpour reveals she has ovarian cancer, ‘confident’ in recovery

The Emmy Award-winning journalist shared her cancer diagnosis with viewers Monday during her program ”Amanpour,” which she’s been absent from the last four weeks while undergoing treatment.

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Journalist Christiane Amanpour arrives for the 47th Annual International Emmy Awards at New York Hilton in New York City in 2019.

Journalist Christiane Amanpour arrives for the 47th Annual International Emmy Awards at New York Hilton in New York City in 2019.

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CNN’s chief international anchor Christiane Amanpour announced she has ovarian cancer.

The Emmy Award-winning journalist shared her cancer diagnosis with viewers Monday during her CNN International program ”Amanpour,” which she’s been absent from the last four weeks while undergoing treatment.

“Like millions of women around the world, I’ve been diagnosed with ovarian cancer,” Amanpour, 63, said. “I’ve had successful major surgery to remove it and I’m now undergoing several months of chemotherapy for the very best possible long-term prognosis and I’m confident.”

According to Mayo Clinic, ovarian cancer is a “common cancer among women” that “starts in the ovaries, and spreads to the abdomen and pelvis if it is not diagnosed and treated early.”

Amanpour said she publicly shared her diagnosis not only for “transparency,” but to highlight the importance of an “early diagnosis” and to “urge women to educate themselves on this disease.”

“Get all the regular screenings and scans that you can,” Amanpour said. “Always listen to your bodies; and of course to ensure that your legitimate medical concerns are not dismissed or diminished.”

Ovarian cancer often goes undetected until it has spread to the pelvis and abdomen, which makes the disease more difficult to treat, according to Mayo Clinic. Symptoms include abdominal bloating or swelling, quickly feeling full when eating, weight loss, frequent need to urinate, changes in bowel habits and discomfort in the pelvic area.

The London-born, Tehran-raised journalist, who first came to America’s attention as an unflappable war correspondent reporting from bombed-out conflict zones around the world, said she feels ”fortunate to have health insurance through work and incredible doctors who are treating me in a country underpinned by, of course, the brilliant (National Health Service)” in the U.K.

Amanpour also hosts PBS’ “Amanpour & Company.”

Contributing: Maria Puente

Read more at usatoday.com

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