GM Chris Getz wants White Sox to find an edge; Sox fall to 55-88 with loss to Tigers

“There’s professionalism, there’s loyalty, there’s execution. Those are the big three pillars I often point to,” Getz said.

SHARE GM Chris Getz wants White Sox to find an edge; Sox fall to 55-88 with loss to Tigers
Jesse Scholtens pitches against the Tigers in the White Sox’ 3-2 loss Sunday.

Jesse Scholtens pitches against the Tigers in the White Sox’ 3-2 loss Sunday.

Duane Burleson/Getty Images

DETROIT — General manager Chris Getz said there’s no obvious recipe to regaining an edge, but the White Sox need to concoct one somehow going into 2024.

“There’s an edge that we’ve lost,” said Getz, who was hired for his new post Aug. 31.

“With that being said, there’s professionalism, there’s loyalty, there’s execution. Those are the big three pillars I often point to. With those pillars, there’s a lot to unpack. But it does represent what it takes to be a championship-caliber ballclub. I look forward to establish what we are going to be about.”

There were a few things to unpack in the Sox’ 3-2 loss to the Tigers on Sunday.

Right fielder Oscar Colas slipped on a throw into the infield that short-hopped Tim Anderson, who didn’t smother it, allowing Andre Lipcius to take second base.

Miscommunication caused Colas to crash into second baseman Elvis Andrus in short right field. Andrus could’ve had a runner doubled off, but first baseman Gavin Sheets couldn’t make a clean backhand scoop of his throw.

And Anderson didn’t run out of the box right away on a high chopper a foot in front of the plate.

“Yeah. He lost the ball,” manager Pedro Grifol said.

And the Sox (55-88) lost a game that officially eliminated them from the postseason, which has been a foregone conclusion for a while.

“It hasn’t been a good season,” Grifol said. “We had high expectations coming in.

“It’s just good to see things, to make difficult decisions a little more accurate in real time here in the big leagues, not in the minor leagues or spring training.”

About that Burger trade

Since he was traded, third baseman Jake Burger was batting .305/.359/.516 with six homers and an .875 OPS in 34 games for the Marlins through Saturday. Between the Sox and Marlins, the 2017 first-round pick has 31 homers, 25 doubles, 69 RBI and an .827 OPS.

Left-hander Jake Eder, the Double-A pitcher the Sox got in return, is 0-3 with an 11.42 ERA in five starts at Birmingham.

Eder has been sent to Arizona to participate in the Sox’ pitchers and catchers camp.

“This allows us to run him through our lab for the first time and gain a better understanding of how his body is moving and help with some adjustments before the Arizona Fall League,” Getz said.

Montgomery in ’24?

Double-A shortstop Colson Montgomery, ranked second among all prospects in baseball by ESPN, figures to wear a Sox uniform at some point in 2024.

Montgomery, who had a 50-game on-base streak in the minors last season, is batting .223/.398/.408 with three homers in 30 games for Birmingham. He has walked 21 times.

“Colson has been very good,” Getz said. “He’s controlled the zone. He’s very selective offensively. Defensively, he’s becoming more consistent. He showed off his range. He’s got a solid arm.”

Montgomery got a late start because of oblique and back injuries and will play in the Arizona Fall League.

“Beyond just Colson, coming into spring training next year, the message is going to be the expectation here is to make this ballclub,” Getz said.

This and that

Yoan Moncada sat out with a sore knee.

Bryan Shaw appeared in his 19th game since Aug. 1, the most in the majors.

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