Sneed: Byrne loved Chicago and in the end, Chicago loved her back

SHARE Sneed: Byrne loved Chicago and in the end, Chicago loved her back
SHARE Sneed: Byrne loved Chicago and in the end, Chicago loved her back

In the end, former Mayor Jane M. Byrne knew the city she loved — but that almost forgot her — loved her back.

A year ago, the legacy of Byrne, the city’s only female mayor, was all but a footnote assigned to the dustbin of history.

But not so Friday, when Byrne died peacefully in her home after a week of hospice care, surrounded by her family.

“My mother was able to look out the window at the city she loved and finally know it had not forgotten her,” said Kathy Byrne, the mayor’s only child.

“She could see the Water Tower, an old family landmark, which will now be included in the park to be renamed in her honor.

“Until she became so weak recently and we knew she would not live much longer, Mother loved hearing and got a kick out of the traffic reports on the radio mentioning the newly renamed Jane Byrne Interchange,” Byrne said.

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