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Chicago White Sox’s Alexei Ramirez, left, and Jose Abreu hold Silver Slugger Awards before a continuation of a suspended baseball game from Friday between the Kansas City Royals and the White Sox in Chicago on Sunday, April 26, 2015. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

Sox rotation in flux as appeals are pending for Chris Sale, Jeff Samardzija

SHARE Sox rotation in flux as appeals are pending for Chris Sale, Jeff Samardzija
SHARE Sox rotation in flux as appeals are pending for Chris Sale, Jeff Samardzija

BY TONI GINNETTI

All parties insist they’ve moved on from Thursday’s on-field altercation, but the consequences linger for the White Sox and Royals.

Manager Robin Ventura can’t set his rotation until the appeals are decided on the five-game suspensions of starters Jeff Samardzija and Chris Sale. Both will make their scheduled starts this week in Baltimore.

“It’s hard replacing two guys in the rotation unless it’s staggered,’’ he said of their likely suspensions. “You hope you have enough arms to get through it.’’

It’s likely rookie Carlos Rodon will get a start, and righthander Scott Carroll—recalled Sunday to replace injured reliever Matt Albers– could as well.

The Royals would lose pitcher Yordano Ventura (a seven-game suspension) and pitcher Edinson Volquez (five games) should they lose their appeals.

Reliever Kelvin Herrera and outfielder Lorenzo Cain also are appealing their two-game suspensions.

But Cain believes the hostilities are over.

“We’ll see what happens [with the appeal] but I think it’s over with,’’ he said Sunday. “We got all our emotions out that night. You just go out now and play baseball.’’

Robin Ventura agreed.

“I think we moved on [Friday night],’’ he said. “Everybody’s back to playing baseball. It was an isolated incident Thursday.’’

Cain admitted the punishments might have fit the crimes.

“You can’t throw haymakers out there,’’ he said.

THE “TALK’’

Ventura talked to both Samardzija and Sale. “They understand,’’ he said of the costly aftermath of the fight. “Emotions will run high with both of those guys just because they’re competitive and that’s the way it goes. But that’s probably a scene that’s not going to happen very often.’’

ACROBAT

Alex Gordon made the play of the game tumbling into the seats along the left field line catching Micah Johnson’s foul fly in the sixth.

“He’s the best left fielder in the American League,’’ Ventura said. “I don’t see the National League that much. Any time a guys goes into the stands it’s dangerous. You better keep it away from him.’’

Sox left fielder Melky Cabrera also made a game-saving catch at the wall to end an eighth inning threat.

“There was great left field play on both sides,’’ Ventura said.

ROSTER MOVES

The Sox and Royals were allowed 26 men for Sunday’s regularly scheduled game under MLB rules. The Sox added pitcher Daniel Webb and designated lefty Eric Surkamp in a corresponding move. Webb was returned after the game.

The teams will make up their rained out Saturday game on July 17 as a split doubleheader.

BOTTOM OF THE SCRUM

Royals hitting coach Dale Sveum, the former Cubs manager, found himself at the bottom of the heap of Thursday’s fracas—ironically along side his former ace Samardzija. “You never want to be at the bottom of one of those,’’ he said.

HONORED

Jose Abreu and Alexei Ramirez received their Silver Slugger Awards and Abreu his Rookie of the Year Award in pre-game ceremonies.

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