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Todd Frazier agreed on a one-year, $12 million contract with the White Sox. (AP)

White Sox avoid arbitration with Frazier, four pitchers

SHARE White Sox avoid arbitration with Frazier, four pitchers
SHARE White Sox avoid arbitration with Frazier, four pitchers

The White Sox avoided arbitration with their five arbitration eligible players Friday, agreeing to terms on one-year contracts with third baseman Todd Frazier ($12 million), right-hander Miguel Gonzalez ($5.9 million), left-hander Dan Jennings ($1.4 million), right-hander Jake Petricka ($825,000) and right-hander Zach Putnam ($1,117,500).

Frazier, 30, hit .225 with 40 homers and 98 RBI in his first season with the Sox. Gonzalez, 32, went 5-8 with a 3.73 ERA over 24 appearances in his first season on the South Side. With the Sox in rebuilding mode after trading away Chris Sale and Adam Eaton for prospects, it’s highly possible neither one will be with the club after the Aug. 1 trade deadline.

Jennings, 29, went 4-3 with a 2.08 ERA over a career-high 64 appearances in 2016. Petricka, 28, was limited to nine appearances in 2016 before undergoing season-ending surgery on his right hip. He owns a 3.31 ERA with 16 saves over parts of four major-league seasons. Putnam, 29, was limited to 25 games (posting a 2.30 ERA) last season due to ulnar neuritis in his right elbow.

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