Authorities identify third man killed in triple-fatal crash on Far South Side

SHARE Authorities identify third man killed in triple-fatal crash on Far South Side
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Authorities have identified the third man killed in a crash early Friday when a car was engulfed in flames on the Far South Side.

Anthony Guajardo, 30, 48-year-old Michael Battista and 47-year-old Ralph A. Quiroz were in a speeding vehicle about 1:10 a.m. when it hit a light pole in the 3300 block of East 100th Street, flipped onto its roof and caught fire, according to Chicago Police and the Cook County Medical Examiner’s Office. All three men were dead at the scene.

An autopsy Saturday found that Guajardo, who lived in the same neighborhood, died of carbon monoxide toxicity and the inhalation of products of combustion in a vehicular fire, according to the medical examiner’s office. Thermal burns were listed as a secondary cause.

Battista, who also lived in the East Side neighborhood, died of carbon monoxide toxicity and multiple injuries from the crash, according to autopsy reports.

Quiroz, who lived in south suburban Alsip, died of carbon monoxide toxicity and the inhalation of products of combustion, according to the medical examiner’s office. Thermal injuries were listed as a secondary cause.

All three deaths were ruled accidents, the medical examiner’s office said.

The CPD Major Accidents Investigation Unit was investigating the crash.

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