Deaths of Malta couple found in burning home ruled murder-suicide

SHARE Deaths of Malta couple found in burning home ruled murder-suicide
18447605_1762394730738110_951732593842024327_n_e1525647410481.jpg

Malta Fire Department

The deaths of a couple found early Sunday in their burning DeKalb County home have been ruled a murder-suicide, according to authorities.

William M. Kreda, 75, and Marjory R. Kreda, 76, were found dead inside their home when emergency crews responded to the fire about 1:40 a.m. at 3355 Gurler Road in rural Malta, according to the DeKalb County Sheriff’s Office.

Crews found the couple’s house and barn on fireafter it was called in by a person who spotted the flames while traveling on Interstate 88, authorities said.

Autopsies conducted Monday by the DeKalb County Coroner’s Office determined both died of gunshot wounds.

Investigators believe William Kreda fatally shot his wife in their second-floor bedroom before he set set their barn and a shed on fire.

The fire set inside the home was determined to have “multiple origins,” authorities said. Kreda set the fires inside the home before returning to the couple’s bedroom and shooting himself. Both were found dead in their bed.

The investigation was ongoing.

The Latest
He was taken to Northwestern Memorial Hospital, where he was listed in fair condition after the 3:15 a.m. rescue.
Americans have long cherished biscuits as a comfort food staple. The warm, flaky texture combined with a buttery flavor creates a sense of nostalgia and coziness.
Since losing two good friends, he has changed his behavior and likes to spend time with new companions half his age.
The new Peterson-Ridge station, plus the one under construction on the South Side, are positive steps for city transit — and, perhaps, another sign for leaders to find some solution to the ‘fiscal cliff’ the region’s transit agencies face in 2026.
Wheaton North seniors Zach Widelski and Ty Nielsen made the most of late bites Saturday to win the state title in bass fishing; plus cicadas, cottonwood fluff and monarchs fill the spring air.