Illinois Senate president’s old ties create at least an appearance of a conflict of interest

This is not to imply that Don Harmon has done or will do anything wrong, but the Senate could have chosen somebody with no potential conflicts of interest.

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Illinois Senate President Don Harmon, D-Oak Park.

Illinois Senate President Don Harmon, D-Oak Park.

AP Photos

Concerning the election of Don Harmon as the new Illinois Senate president — I see some red flags. A Sun-Times story raised a number of possible conflicts of interest because of his connection to a “clout-heavy law firm” from which he says he has now resigned. The firm has done legal work for more than 20 government bodies and represented government pension funds. Harmon voted on a casino bill which this firm helped write for suburban Des Plaines.

This is not to imply that Harmon did or will do anything wrong, but in this day and age you would think the Senate would choose a president who does not have such potential conflicts of interest. Even the appearance of conflicts can be issue, diminishing confidence in government.

Mario Caruso, Lincoln Square

Basketball hardly a priority

The very last quote in Tuesday’s story about the Lincoln Park High School scandal says it all: “We worked too hard to come this far just for our season to end. It’s pretty messed up.”

All allegations of misconduct and unprofessionalism at the school should be swept under the rug because the school has a good basketball team? That just shows what matters more. Unbelievable.

Mike Viola, Bartlett

Those Senate mean kids

Lynn Sweet’s column comparing senators attending the impeachment trial to cliques in a high school cafeteria was apt. The rest of the time, the Senate seems more like a junior high cafeteriawith endless food fights. Or a partisan brawling between gangs using political bicycle chains, brass knuckles and switch-blades.

John McClelland, Evanston

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