Baseball Hall of Fame will set induction ceremony for full capacity

Hall of Fame officials said Monday that tickets will not be required for the event’s free lawn seating area. The ceremony is scheduled for Sept. 8 on the grounds of Clark Sports Center.

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The Baseball Hall of Fame will plan for full capacity for lawn seating area at this year’s induction ceremony.

The Baseball Hall of Fame will plan for full capacity for lawn seating area at this year’s induction ceremony.

Tim Roske/AP

COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. — The Baseball Hall of Fame’s induction ceremony is returning to its standard seating format, opening the door for another big crowd.

Hall of Fame officials said Monday that tickets will not be required for the event’s free lawn seating area. The ceremony is scheduled for Sept. 8 on the grounds of Clark Sports Center and will honor class of 2020 members Derek Jeter, Marvin Miller, Ted Simmons and Larry Walker. No one was selected this year.

Inductions have been held outside the center since 1992 and the largest crowd was estimated at 70,000 for Cal Ripken Jr. and Tony Gwynn in 2007. The second-largest crowd on record — an estimated 55,000 people — attended the last induction ceremony, in July 2019. Crowds have surpassed 50,000 at five of the past six ceremonies, from 2014-2019. Last year’s was canceled due to the coronavirus pandemic.

The Hall of Fame’s annual awards presentation will remain an indoor, television-only event, on July 24. Al Michaels (2021) and former White Sox broadcaster Ken “Hawk” Harrelson (2020) will receive the Ford C. Frick Award for broadcasting excellence, Dick Kaegel (2021) and Nick Cafardo (2020) will receive the Baseball Writers’ Association of America Career Excellence Award, and David Montgomery will receive the Buck O’Neil Lifetime Achievement Award from last year.

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