Snacking can be good for you; just follow these guidelines

One key thing to keep in mind: Aim to snack on filling foods with good sources of protein or dietary fiber.

SHARE Snacking can be good for you; just follow these guidelines
You can build healthy snaking habits.

You can build healthy snaking habits.

TNS

We’ve become a snacking nation. What once was discouraged as a spoiler of appetites has come to be considered a healthful habit.

But not all snacks are healthy.

To help make sure yours are, here are some easy-to-follow guidelines:

  • First, pay attention to the driving force behind the snack. Are you actually hungry? Or snacking as a break or reward or for stress management or comfort?
  • Aim for filling foods with good sources of protein or dietary fiber. Building your snacks around protein like peanut butter or sunflower butter or a fiber source like whole grain crackers or air-popped popcorn helps the snack satisfy your hunger longer.
  • Include a second food for flavor, enjoyment and nutrition. For instance, pair your peanut butter with a sliced apple or banana. Include hummus with your whole grain crackers or a small helping of unsweetened dried fruit with your popcorn.

Environmental Nutrition is written by experts on health and nutrition.

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