Duncan Keith's wife denied bid for $150,000 in monthly spousal support

SHARE Duncan Keith's wife denied bid for $150,000 in monthly spousal support
Screen_Shot_2015_09_24_at_4.09.57_PM_999x888.jpg

During the 2014-15 NHL season, the Chicago Blackhawks and Duncan Keith were subject to salacious rumors that left Keith calling the past year “extremely difficult.”

[nicelink url=http://chicago.suntimes.com/blackhawks-hockey/7/71/779505/duncan-keith-says-past-year-extremely-difficult-divorce-patrick-sharp-rumors]

Keith and his wife Kelly separated last year and earlier this week, Kelly was denied a bid for $150,000 in monthly spousal support by the British Columbia Supreme Court.

Via The Vancouver Sun:

The wife of National Hockey League star Duncan Keith has lost an interim bid in B.C. Supreme Court to get her husband to pay $150,000 per month in spousal support. Kelly Keith had sought the huge interim payout, along with $69,270 per month in child support, claiming she had suffered economic hardship and disadvantages arising from the couple’s marriage breakdown in June 2014. Duncan argued that Kelly should receive $15,000 in spousal support and $10,000 for their son.

Keith had been paying $10,000 per month in child support in addition to another $10,000 monthly for the mortgage and expenses related to the couple’s home in Canada where Kelly lives with the couple’s two-year-old son Colton.

British Columbia Supreme Court Justice George MacIntosh ruled that Kelly’s $150,000 per month request was “disproportionately high” and ordered Keith to pay Kelly $45,000 per month in spousal support and $15,000 per month in child support.

The Latest
Alexander Canario’s home ignited a Cubs offense that found its groove late in Tuesday’s 5-3 win vs. the Marlins.
The 20-year-old was found Saturday in a bedroom of a home in the 7700 block of South Trumbull Avenue, police said.
White Sox lose for eighth time in last nine games
After Alzolay’s latest blunder, the Cubs might have a closer problem.
Despite the team’s horrible start, Sox veterans say the group’s mindset is about as good as it can be.