‘I have multiple sclerosis,’ John King tells CNN viewers

Anchor reveals the MS diagnosis during an on-air discussion of COVID-19 vaccine manndates.

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CNN anchor John King speaks at a March 5, 2020, event in New York City.

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NEW YORK — CNN anchor John King revealed during an on-air discussion of COVID-19 vaccine mandates on Tuesday that he has multiple sclerosis.

“I’m going to share a secret I’ve never spoken before,” King said while leading a panel discussion on his “Inside Politics” show. “I’m immunocompromised. I have multiple sclerosis. So, I’m grateful you’re all vaccinated.”

King and his guests were talking about mandates in the context of the death of former Secretary of State Colin Powell, who died Monday of COVID complications despite being vaccinated because he had cancer that compromised his immune system.

CNN mandates that all of its employees who come to work in an office or are out in the field with other people be vaccinated, and fired three employees this summer when they came to work unvaccinated.

King, 58, said his 10-year-old son can’t be vaccinated yet, and he’s concerned about bringing the virus home to him.

“I don’t like the government telling me what to do,” King said. “I don’t like my boss telling me what to do. In this case, it’s important.”

King has worked as a political reporter, White House correspondent and national correspondent for CNN after joining the network from The Associated Press in 1997.

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