Woman’s body pulled from Chicago River on Lower West Side — fourth body found in city waterways in a week

Her body was spotted and pulled from the water Friday morning at Damen Avenue, police said.

SHARE Woman’s body pulled from Chicago River on Lower West Side — fourth body found in city waterways in a week
A Chicago Police Department officer.

Sun-Times file

A woman’s body was pulled from the Chicago River on the Lower West Side Friday morning — the fourth body pulled from water in Chicago in a week.

She was spotted and pulled from the water at Damen Avenue around 7:50 a.m., police said. The woman was pronounced dead at the scene.

She was identified as Karina Alanis, 31, by the Cook County medical examiner’s office.

The circumstances of her death were unclear.

Three other people were found dead in the Chicago River and Lake Michigan last weekend.

Saturday morning, the body of Yuet Tsang, 80, was pulled from the water in the South Branch of the Chicago River at Eleanor Street near Bridgeport, officials said.

Later that day, another woman’s body was pulled from the river in the Loop, in the 100 block of North Riverside Plaza near Ogilvie Station.

On Sunday, the body of a male was recovered from the water in Lake Michigan near the 31st Street Harbor.

Autopsy results have not been released in any of the cases.

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