The U.S. has been encouraging and supplying Saudi Arabia’s war crimes in Yemen since March 2015. Now the war is the worst man-made humanitarian catastrophe on earth, with untold numbers dead, injured or suffering from disease and starvation, thanks to U.S.-made planes dropping U.S.-made bombs sold to the Saudis.

On Oct. 2, the grotesque Saudis lured Jamal Khashoggi, a U.S.- based Saudi journalist and critic, to their consulate in Turkey and murdered and dismembered him. Big mistake. The senators and representatives, who helped the president cover up our war crimes with the Saudis, are now using the Khashoggi killing to expiate some of their guilt for enabling the slaughter in Yemen. Last Wednesday, a Senate committee voted 63-37 to advance a resolution to end U.S. military assistance to the war, with full floor debate to come.

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Then it’s on to the House, which recently shut off debate on a similar resolution. Even if the House grows a conscience, the War Criminal in Chief has threatened to keep America’s bomb and plane factories humming while Yemenis are sacrificed to capitalism.

The Senate vote is just a baby step on the long road to peace. We must all demand our elected officials take back their constitutional authority to declare war. The infant anti-war movement must turn this first small step into a gallop.

Walt Zlotow, Glen Ellyn

Search for a missing cane

I can’t believe someone would steal a cane from a handicapped person, but it is true. After shopping recently, my husband left his cane in a shopping cart in the parking lot. Driving home, he asked me to see if the cane was behind the seat, where he usually put it.

It was not, so we turned the pickup around and headed back to the parking lot. We found the cart but the cane was missing. I went in the store and asked if anyone had turned in a wooden cane with black tape on the handle — a cane that had once belonged to my beloved late mother. I was told no one had turned it in. I checked the aisles to see if anyone had it in their cart, but did not find it. I asked the workers in charge of the carts if they happened to see a cane. They said no.

To whomever stole it, I hope you and your conscience will have a Merry Christmas. My husband, who is 85, won’t, without the use of his sturdy cane that allows him to walk since his knees rub bone-on-bone.

Margaret Seiders-Metz, Burbank

Make this the season for sharing

Most Americans celebrate the Christmas season with social gatherings of family, friends and co-workers, take in a holiday performance, attend a children’s performance, or visit an outdoor seasonal event. They may attend a place of worship, with festive choirs, to share in the true meaning of the holiday.

Unfortunately, this year “Peace on Earth” has become an illusion for many American families due to severe wildfires, damaging winds and flash floods. These victims need immediate shelter, health care, clothing, food and transportation.

To make your Christmas one that will give you joy, try sharing from your means with those who desperately need assistance. Your reward is the gratitude from the unknown families who may benefit from your sincere response.

Bob Sweeney, Warwick, Rhode Island