White Sox closer Alex Colome looking to improve on 2019 season

Right-hander Alex Colome was pretty good in his first season as White Sox closer. He wants to be better.

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Alex Colome of the Chicago White Sox pitches to the Tampa Bay Rays on July 20, 2019 in St. Petersburg, Florida. (Photo by Julio Aguilar/Getty Images)

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GOODYEAR, Ariz. – Right-hander Alex Colome was pretty good in his first season as White Sox closer. He wants to be better.

Colome collected 30 saves while posting a 2.80 ERA in 62 games covering 61 innings in 2019 he viewed as acceptable. He wants 2020 to improve from start to finish.

“It was good, not bad,” Colome said Saturday. “They gave me a lot of opportunities and I tried to do my best. But this year I can be better, the bullpen can be better, the team can be better.’’

Colome was better in the first half (2.02 ERA, .482 OPS against) than the second (3.91 ERA, .769 OPS against). But overall, he was reliable in save situations, converting 30 of 33 for a 90.9 percentage ranking second in the American League and fifth in Sox history.

“I’m preparing my mind to do better last year – better command, try to get more outs [in key situations],” Colome said.

Colome said he would like to appear in as many as nine or 10 Cactus League games.

“I just want to come away feeling like I can throw in three or four days in a row,” he said.

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