Evanston takes control early in win over Niles West

SHARE Evanston takes control early in win over Niles West
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Evanston 66, Niles West 34

THE SKINNY

The Evanston girls basketball team broke out of a recent shooting slump with an emphatic win over Niles West on Fridayin Evanston. The Wildkits swept the season series, having previously won 35-24 on Dec.4, 2013, in Skokie.

TURNING POINT

Evanston (15-5 overall, 4-2 CSL South)was determined to play at a faster pace than in the first meeting. They forced the action with a defensive trap, and created 12 steals. The Wildkits also hit 7 of 10 shots in the first quarter, opening a 17-4 lead. They led 36-15 at the break.

THE STARS

Senior Sierra Clayborn led Evanston with 18 points. Her twin sister Seara Clayborn added 16 and freshman Krystal Forrester poured in a career-high 13.

BY THE NUMBERS

Evanstonhit six 3-pointers and held a 36-16 rebound advantage. Freshman Leighah-Amori Wool had nine points and a team-high seven rebounds for Evanston. Wildkits senior Dashae Shumate had five points in her final regular-season game against Niles West, which is where she played her first two high school seasons. Sophomore Jaylynn Estrada led Niles West (6-9, 1-5)with nine points.

QUOTABLE

“Last time we played them, they controlled the tempo, and I just knew they were going to try and do that again. Our kids did a good job of moving, and defensively we were working on some traps. [Offensively]it was an improvement over the last couple games. We were ready to catch and shoot the ball.” — Evanston coach Elliot Whitefield


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