Bronzeville

“It’s about connecting people with their culture and history of one of the African American communities of Chicago, as well as bringing people from all over the city to enjoy what Bronzeville has to offer,” said Frances Guichard of Gallery Guichard.
“As you walk and drive around Bronzeville, Harold’s works are everywhere,” author Nathan Thompson said. “Harold was one of the freedom fighters,” Rev. Jesse Jackson said.
Construction on the $43 million development at 79th and Halsted streets is expected to start Wednesday, with the city promising that pending projects in other areas will follow.
“Our hope is that people will be inspired by what they see and encouraged to see a new normal,” said LUV Institute Executive Director Cosette Wilburn.
NBC changed Christine Houston’s play a lot to turn it into a television show. But she retained stage rights, and the original play is still performed. It has returned to the South Side for another run, at the ETA Creative Arts Foundation.
Fresh Move employees say they’ve had to double their orders from urban farms to keep up with community needs amid high grocery prices and a lack of fresh food options on the city’s South and West sides.
At a ribbon-cutting for a EV charging station in Bronzeville, ComEd officials announced a new proposed plan to lower air pollution in the state and invest in clean energy sources.
The long-vacant, two-story former Lake Meadows professional building at 31st Street and Rhodes Avenue — a dormant but architecturally significant modernist South Side office building — is getting a major fix-up.
The privately operated, publicly funded school has used cash advances and “predatory loans” for funding, city school officials say. Urban Prep leaders say its financial issues are resolved.
It is expected to serve more than 50,000 patients in Bronzeville and nearby communities every year. About 1,000 construction and 100 health care jobs will be created by the development.
For the past 13 years, Urban Prep Academies, with campuses downtown, in Bronzeville and in Englewood — has boasted that 100% of its graduating seniors are accepted to four-year colleges.
The male was inside a home in the 4700 block of South Cottage Grove Avenue, when he was shot in the chest after getting into a fight with another male.
Since his release from federal prison three years ago, South Side native Aaron Smith has dedicated his time to sharing stories of convicts-turned-entrepreneurs in an effort to change the narrative around formerly incarcerated people.
The boy was shot while riding in a car in the 4900 block of South Prairie Avenue, police said.
Apostolic Faith Church, 3823 S. Indiana Ave., has done a coat drive for 30 years.
Youth Connection Leadership Academy is looking for a new home, but the teachers union is worried the school might close instead, leaving students in the lurch. “This is their second home, and for some of them, it’s their first home,” a staff member said.
A 71-year-old man was found in his bedroom, where the fire began, in cardiac arrest, officials said.
The author of a new book on the guitar great recalls a set that thrilled the Bronzeville crowd — and disappointed the band.
The South Side Connectivity Collaborative will place 11 Comcast “Lift Zones” around the South Side to provide “high capacity” internet access in four neighborhoods within the next two months.
Ebony Blue’s mobile coffee bar Southside Grinds will have a grand opening ceremony Saturday at the Bronzeville enterprise hub.
The victim, 31, was taken to University of Chicago Medical Center in critical condition.
When parts of the country are trying to whitewash history, a few Chicagoans band together to remember ours.
In 2008, the City Council borrowed $85 million to buy the shuttered hospital, hoping to put an Olympic athletes village there for the 2016 Games. But Chicago lost its bid for those Games, and the site has remained vacant.