Windows smashed, arrests made in Ferguson protest

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FERGUSON, Mo. — Protesters have returned to Ferguson streets hours after a makeshift memorial for Michael Brown burned, with reports of smashed windows and possible arson.

The St. Louis suburb was the site of sometimes-violent protests and looting in the days after 18-year-old Brown was shot by a Ferguson police officer on Aug. 9.

Up to 200 protesters gathered late Tuesday night. Windows were smashed at a beauty shop on West Florissant Avenue, where much of the looting happened last month. A small fire outside a custard shop appeared to be intentionally set, according to fire officials.

Police began clearing the street around 12:15 a.m. Wednesday.

Media reports said arrests were made, but the Missouri State Highway Patrol did not return messages to confirm how many.

Protesters argue with a Ferguson sergeant who was trying to get them to disperse the area on West Florissant Avenue in Ferguson late Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2014. | St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Robert Cohen / AP

Protesters argue with a Ferguson sergeant who was trying to get them to disperse the area on West Florissant Avenue in Ferguson late Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2014. | St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Robert Cohen / AP

A woman walks past a new teddy bear memorial that is cordoned off on Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2014, in Ferguson, Mo., near the spot of where Michael Brown was shot by Ferguson police office Darren Wilson on Aug. 9. The original teddy bear memorial was destroyed

A woman walks past a new teddy bear memorial that is cordoned off on Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2014, in Ferguson, Mo., near the spot of where Michael Brown was shot by Ferguson police office Darren Wilson on Aug. 9. The original teddy bear memorial was destroyed by fire earlier Tuesday morning. Ferguson police spokesman Devin James says the cause of the fire is under investigation.| Jeff Roberson / AP

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