Sheryl Swoopes investigation ongoing, but new allegations emerge

SHARE Sheryl Swoopes investigation ongoing, but new allegations emerge
ncaa_villanova_north_carolina_final_four_basketbal_60446145.jpg

Former WNBA player Sheryl Swoopes, the Loyola head coach, was named to the Naismith Memorial Hall of Fame last month. (AP)

Six weeks after Loyola launched an investigation of women’s basketball coach Sheryl Swoopes, more allegations were leveled at the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer on Sunday.

The coaching staff took laptops and books away from players during road trips and told them to focus on basketball, sources confirmed.

Athletic director Steve Watson texted players to set up meetings with a third-party investigator despite the investigation being independent of the athletic department, according to the Loyola Phoenix student newspaper, which also claimed Swoopes once threw a water cup at a player.

Law firm Dykema is helping with the investigation, sources confirmed, and has reached out to former players. Loyola’s athletic department did not immediately comment.

Last month, 10 players declared their intent to transfer, many citing emotional abuse by Swoopes, the former star player hired in 2013 despite limited coaching experience.

Loyola has yet to announce the investigation’s findings.


The Latest
Getz isn’t naming names, but it’s known he’s listening on everyone, Garrett Crochet, Luis Robert Jr. and Erick Fedde included. He acknowledged five or six players could be dealt as the Sox build for the future.
Two things are already clear: Sonya Massey, who called 911 for help, should still be alive. And Sean Grayson, who held six police jobs in four years, probably had no business being a Sangamon County deputy.
Hoover, called “one of the most notorious criminals in Illinois history,” is scheduled to make a rare public appearance in court Sept. 26. He claims to have renounced the criminal organization he led.
The Cubs lost to the Brewers 3-2 on Wednesday to fall 11 games back in the division standings.
The Sox’ run toward the 1962 Mets’ dreaded 120 losses looks more realistic by the day.