Hosts discuss Rachel Dolezal, Nat Geo April Issue in Ep. 7 of “Zebra Sisters”

SHARE Hosts discuss Rachel Dolezal, Nat Geo April Issue in Ep. 7 of “Zebra Sisters”
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Leslie Baldacci (left) and Mary Mitchell, of the Zebra Sisters podcast, in the Chicago Sun-Times sound booth, Tuesday, Feb. 20, 2018. | Ashlee Rezin/Sun-Times

In Episode 7 of “Zebra Sisters,” a podcast on race relations hosted by columnist Mary Mitchell and former reporter Leslie Baldacci, the hosts discuss the upcoming Rachel Dolezal documentary and National Geographic’s April issue.

The hosts applaud high school students marching against gun violence, and Leslie shares how she’s reactivating her activism.

In light of the upcoming documentary on Rachel Dolezal, Mary wonders if you can decide to be a different race. We accept transgender identification, can we accept “transracial?”

RELATED: New Sun-Times podcast ‘Zebra Sisters’ tackles race relations with candor, humor

Then, the hosts discuss National Geographic’s April issue about the magazine’s past racism. What does the cover mean for the future of the magazine?

Mary answers Leslie’s question about a southern expression.

And Mary asks Leslie: What’s the most racist remark you heard a friend say, and what did you do in response?

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