No surprise if Sox sock it to Chicago by moving

Major League Baseball has a history of moving teams. Like any business, MLB survives by branching out and spreading its footprint.

SHARE No surprise if Sox sock it to Chicago by moving
Chicago White Sox fans cheer for their team during the eighth inning of a baseball game between the San Francisco Giants in Chicago, Wednesday, April 5, 2023. The White Sox won 7-3. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh) ORG XMIT: CXS121

Chicago White Sox fans cheer for their team during the eighth inning of a baseball game between the San Francisco Giants in Chicago, April 5.

AP

As a weekend-plan White Sox season ticket holder, my stomach dropped when I read about the rumor that the White Sox could be sold, or possibly moved to Nashville. The reason for my anxiety is well-founded: Major League Baseball has a history of moving teams.

The current top two teams in the National League, the Braves and the Dodgers, were each founded in a different city. The Oakland A’s are moving to Las Vegas; in fact the A’s used to be The Kansas City A’s, and before that the Philadelphia A’s. Moving cities isn’t bad either for success on the field, the Braves, Dodgers and A’s all had success after changing cities.

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The Giants, the Expos (Nats), the Rangers, the Twins, the Orioles, are all franchises that have moved around and either kept or changed their names. When the league was smaller it was common for major cities to have two teams. Boston and Philadelphia each had two teams, and for a time, New York had three. With the A’s move to Las Vegas, only New York and Chicago remain as cities where the same public transportation can be used to get to games. (It’s a stretch to consider the Dodgers/Angels and the Nationals/Orioles in the same city and/or metropolitan area.)

But having two teams in one city isn’t good for Major League Baseball. Like any business, MLB survives by branching out and spreading its footprint. MLB doesn’t care that a city or state isn’t paying for a new stadium. That’s just an excuse, MLB wants to expand its footprint.

With MLB expanding inter-league play and adding the designated hitter, the differences between the leagues has diminished to the point where the intra-metropolitan rivalries are not what they once were: games between two unique styles of play, and games that were rare. MLB doesn’t gain any additional value from these rivalries anymore.

If history and the nature of business are reliable guides, then my anxiety is justified. The White Sox are likely to move.

Joshua Richards, South Loop

Republicans have changed for the worse

Imagine how the Republicans would be reacting if Donald Trump and his sheeple political puppets were Democrats. Inciting a riot in our most beloved building of historic democracy. Indictment after indictment. Lying about a stolen election even though several courts of his own party found no foul play. Unfounded conspiracies. Threatening Supreme Court judges and ballot-counters. There would be cries of “unpatriotic traitors,” “American terrorists,” and fraud.

This isn’t about right and wrong. It’s about being a Republican, and even though that used to mean something great, it doesn’t seem to anymore as they uphold anti-American sentiments such as these. I think you could picture it quite clearly if the shoe was on the other foot.

Thomas Bajorek, Burbank

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