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Frank Main

Staff reporter

Frank Main began his newspaper career in 1987 in Tulsa, Oklahoma and worked in Louisiana and Kentucky, covering local politics and crime. He was on the ground for Hurricanes Andrew and Katrina, the Bosnia conflict, the first Gulf War and the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks in New York. In 2011, Main, another reporter and a photographer won the Pulitzer Prize for their stories in the Sun-Times about a ‘no-snitch code’ among Chicago’s victims of gun violence. For that project, Main spent six months embedded with homicide detectives. He’s a graduate of Emory University and Northwestern University’s graduate journalism program and teaches journalism at Loyola University.

El Departamento de Policía de Chicago actualmente tiene dos helicópteros.
Chicago police officials say they ‘anticipate’ acquiring two helicopters and might use private donations to help pay for them. Sheriff Tom Dart hopes to get a helicopter, too.
The drug diversion program, the largest of its kind in the country, was piloted on the West Side in 2018 and expanded citywide late last year.
Adan Casarrubias Salgado — also known as “Tomatito,” “Star” and “Silver” — is charged with conspiracy, drug trafficking and money laundering.
In March, the Illinois Senate rejected the appointments of two interim board members. A third quit rather than face a vote. With two new members, the board returned Thursday.
A lawyer for Chester Weger — paroled in 2020 and trying to prove his innocence — says a 1960 police report of an operator overhearing a pay phone call shows Weger wasn’t the killer.
Supporters of doing away with so-called intensive probation units say it was a “gotcha” system that didn’t reduce crime. Others say it helped get guns and drugs off the streets.
Ken Griffin, founder of Citadel, and businessman Michael Sacks gave seed money for two academies at the University of Chicago to train police leaders and people who run violence interruption groups.
The sheriff initially defied Judge Edward Maloney’s order, saying a new law requires the furloughs, but changed his mind after the Sun-Times posted a story Friday about the case.