Corey Crawford signs contract with Devils, officially ending Blackhawks tenure

Crawford signed a two-year contract with New Jersey on Friday night after becoming a free agent earlier in the day.

SHARE Corey Crawford signs contract with Devils, officially ending Blackhawks tenure
Crawford_Devils.jpg

Corey Crawford will join the Devils after 17 seasons in the Blackhawks’ organization.

Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images

Corey Crawford’s 17-year Blackhawks tenure unofficially ended Thursday, but officially ended Friday.

Crawford signed a two-year contract with a $3.9 million cap hit with the Devils late Friday night, roughly 12 hours after his unrestricted free agency began.

The Devils had bought out Cory Schneider earlier in the offseason, creating a vacancy in their goaltending tandem alongside 2019-20 rookie Mackenzie Blackwood.

The 35-year-old will have a good chance to be New Jersey’s starting goalie for opening night of the 2020-21 season, whenever that occurs.

After 488 regular season and 96 postseason starts, becoming the first-ever Hawks to win multiple Stanley Cups along the way, Crawford’s long run as the No. 1 goaltender in Chicago ended emotionally Thursday.

“He’s up there with the legends of the Blackhawks,” general manager Stan Bowman said. “Looking back at his career trajectory, he never got the proper recognition early on. We had such star-studded teams. Corey was fantastic back in 2013 when we beat the Bruins. His importance to our team grew and grew, going to the 2015 team.”

The Latest
Maxwell Street Market opens for the season Sunday, but some longtime vendors won’t be at the storied market amid operational changes reducing the number of stands and excluding food booths.
In this week’s “Polling Place,” we also asked you to pick your Stanley Cup finals winner as well as an NBA conference finals superstar around whom to build a team.
He was a “miracle worker” at helping make the dreams of young playwrights and directors come true, according to a friend and former colleague.
Cicadas swarm Chicago suburbs, Megan Thee Stallion performs at the United Center, piping plover Green Dot makes an appearance and Wayfair fans flock to its first physical store.
“It really put me on edge,” Samaya Acker, a senior at Air Force Academy High School on the South Side, says of the new form’s flawed rollout, which has delayed financial aid awards and college decisions for many high school seniors and others hoping to attend college next year.