General Iron to fully reopen in Lincoln Park

The city has given the metal shredder permission to resume operations as soon as Saturday.

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General Iron plans to leave its current location at 1909 N. Clifton in Lincoln Park to move to the Southeast Side.

General Iron plans to leave its current location at 1909 N. Clifton in Lincoln Park to move to the Southeast Side.

Sun-Times file

General Iron, closed since May after explosions at its Lincoln Park metal shredding facility, can resume full operations as soon as Saturday after city officials gave the business clearance to fully reopen.

The business was allowed to partially reopen in June, but was still under a city order to keep its metal-shredding equipment idled until it satisfied the city it had resolved the issues that caused the blasts. Last week, a consultant to the city approved the fixes.

Chicago’s fire and buildings departments inspected the equipment this week, according to a city order allowing reopening, effective August 8.

In a letter to General Iron’s parent company, Reserve Management Group, the city’s Corporation Counsel Mark Flessner said the company met its legal obligations to show safeguards were in place to prevent another accident.

“It is with reluctance that I send this letter, considering the disruption and concern that the facility’s recent explosion caused to the city and the surrounding community,” he wrote. “I wish to make very clear that the city will be closely monitoring the facility.”

Reserve Management Group is in the process of moving General Iron’s operation to the Southeast Side, a plan strongly opposed by community groups there.

Brett Chase’s reporting on the environment and public health is made possible by a grant from The Chicago Community Trust.

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