Meet the lineup for Marquee Sports Network, which includes former Cubs manager Lou Piniella

The Cubs might not have signed any significant players for their roster this offseason, but they’ve inked plenty of All-Star talent for Marquee Sports Network.

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Lou Piniella will serve as a part-time analyst for Marquee Sports Network, which will launch next month.

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The Cubs might not have signed any significant players for their roster this offseason, but they’ve inked plenty of All-Star talent for Marquee Sports Network, including former manager Lou Piniella.

During a panel Saturday at the Cubs Convention, president of business operations Crane Kenney announced 13 hires who will make up the tentative lineup for Marquee, which is expected to launch next month.

Piniella, one of the more surprising hires, will work as a part-time analyst. After a brief visit with him, Marquee general manager Mike McCarthy said the 76-year-old former Cubs manager was ‘‘more than interested’’ in joining the network.

‘‘[He] looks great and sounds great,’’ McCarthy said. ‘‘We’re going to have a lot of fun with Lou.’’

Several other familiar faces also will be seen on the network, including the TV broadcast duo of Len Kasper and Jim Deshaies. They periodically will be joined by a rotating cast of former Cubs who will serve as analysts, including fan favorites Mark DeRosa, Ryan Dempster and Rick Sutcliffe.

‘‘They all wanted to be a part of it and to bring that color to our fans and their perspectives,’’ Kenney said. ‘‘Len and JD do a great job. But to put a hitter in the box with JD to talk pitcher versus hitter about a situation, it creates more energy and more fun.’’

Other hires include NFL Network’s Cole Wright, who will host the pregame and postgame shows, and ex-Rockies field reporter Taylor McGregor. Fox’s Chris Myers is expected to do some play-by-play and studio work.

Here’s a look at the Marquee lineup as of Saturday:

Len Kasper, play-by-play: Has been in the Cubs’ broadcast booth since 2005.

Jim Deshaies, analyst: Has been Kasper’s partner-in-crime in the booth since 2013.

Cole Wright, studio host: Chicago-area native previously worked at NFL Network.

Taylor McGregor, field reporter: Spent the last two seasons working as a field reporter for the Rockies, for whom her late father was an executive for 10 years.

Ryan Dempster, studio host, analyst: Two-time All-Star and budding comedian will bring his ‘‘Off the Mound’’ show to Marquee. Still will work for MLB Network, too.

Rick Sutcliffe, analyst: Known as the ‘‘Red Baron,’’ the three-time All-Star and 1984 National League Cy Young Award winner plans to split time working for ESPN and Marquee.

Carlos Pena, analyst: Played 14 seasons in the majors and previously worked as an analyst for NESN. Will work for MLB Network, too.

Mark DeRosa, analyst: Fan favorite from the 2007 and 2008 Cubs, who went to the playoffs in each of those seasons, still is expected to work for MLB Network.

Doug Glanville, analyst: Former major-league outfielder has worked as an analyst for NBC Sports Chicago and ESPN.

Lou Piniella, analyst: ‘‘Sweet Lou’’ is coming out of retirement to do some part-time work as an analyst.

Dan Plesac, analyst: After 18 seasons in the majors, he has built himself a career as an analyst for MLB Network.

Jason Hammel, analyst: This will be the former Cubs right-hander’s first broadcast gig.

Chris Myers, play-by-play, studio host: Emmy Award winner with three decades of broadcast experience was endorsed by Bill Murray.

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