Cubs’ Albert Almora leaves intrasquad game after running into outfield wall

Almora raced straight back on a shot by Kris Bryant off Craig Kimbrel but was unable to snare the ball before his momentum led him into the ivy-covered brick wall.

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St Louis Cardinals v Chicago Cubs

Almora in 2019.

Photo by David Banks/Getty Images

Cubs outfielder Albert Almora left Friday night’s simulated game at Wrigley Field after crashing into the center field wall.

Uh-oh?

It sure looked like it when Almora raced straight back on a shot by Bryant off Craig Kimbrel but was unable to snare the ball before his momentum led him into the ivy-covered brick wall. Outfielders Kyle Schwarber and Jason Heyward rushed to Almora, who remained face-down on the warning track for about two minutes as a pair of trainers and manager David Ross tended to him.

After walking about 25 feet toward the dugout, Almora, hat and glove off, went down to a knee for a few seconds, appearing to collect himself. Then — under his own power — he took a slow, ginger walk to the dugout, down the steps and into the clubhouse.

Not 10 minutes later, word came from a Cubs spokesman that Almora had mildly bruised his ribs and could be back in action at camp on Saturday. Not a minute after that, Almora was standing in the on-deck circle with a bat in his hand. He walked to the plate and hit an RBI single.

Uh-oh?

Guess not.

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