Lysol can kill coronavirus on surfaces, EPA says

Two versions of the common household disinfectant spray were lab tested by the agency.

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“The EPA’s approval recognizes that using Lysol Disinfectant Spray can help to prevent the spread of COVID-19 on hard, non-porous surfaces,” said one Lysol company executive.

“The EPA’s approval recognizes that using Lysol Disinfectant Spray can help to prevent the spread of COVID-19 on hard, non-porous surfaces,” said one Lysol company executive.

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Lysol is the first surface disinfectant approved by the Environmental Protection Agency to wipe out the coronavirus. 

Two versions of the common household disinfectant spray were lab tested by the agency, which found they could kill the virus on surfaces, the EPA announced. Lysol Disinfectant Spray and Lysol Disinfectant Max Cover Mist can kill the virus in under 2 minutes, the agency found. 

“The EPA’s approval recognizes that using Lysol Disinfectant Spray can help to prevent the spread of COVID-19 on hard, non-porous surfaces,” said Rahul Kadyan, executive vice president of hygiene for Lysol’s parent company Reckitt Benckiser in a statement.

“In the face of the pandemic, Lysol continues to work with a wide range of scientific and health experts to educate the public on the importance of hygiene.”

In March, the EPA released a lengthy list of household cleaners that were expected to be effective against coronavirus because they have been tested and proven to work against similar viruses. The news sent the products flying off shelves, leading to shortages at many local grocery stores. 

Many supermarkets still limit the number of cleaning supplies people can buy to cut down on hoarding. Supply chain experts previously told USA TODAY that manufacturers like Lysol and Clorox weren’t ready for a flood of Americans suddenly shopping for disinfectant.

USA TODAY reached out to Lysol to find out if they’re having issues with the availability of cleaning products. 

Read more at usatoday.com

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