Giuliana and Bill Rancic selling TV show items for charity

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Guiliana and Bill Rancic are selling furnishings from their reality TV show to benefit a cancer charity. | Jordan Strauss/Invision

TV personalities Giuliana and Bill Rancic — who split their time between Los Angeles and their Gold Coast home in Chicago — are selling the furnishings seen on their popular reality show “Guiliana & Bill” this coming weekend.

The sale is being run by the Coy-Krupp home sales firm, and will take place from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday at 1444 Old Skokie Valley Road in Highland Park. Sales numbers will be available beginning at 9:30 a.m.

The good news: 100 percent of the Rancics’ sale proceeds will be donated to the breast and ovarian cancer charity, Fab-U-Wish.

The wide array of items being offered for sale include designer chairs, a Chinese sideboard, a pickled oak chest of drawers, a white linen button-tufted Chesterfield sofa with matching pair of club chairs, lamps, bookshelves a mahogany server designed by noted designer Alexa Hampton for Hickory Chair, a coffee table, rugs, a white leather and wood bassinet and an Arcade Party Pac-Man game by Namco.

For more information go to coykrupp.com


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