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Photo gallery: Remembering White Sox great Minnie Minoso

Minnie Minoso, the first black player for the Chicago White Sox, passed away Sunday morning. He was 89.

Minoso played for the White Sox from 1951-57, ’60-61, ’64, and briefly as a player-coach in ’76 and ’80 and in December, was denied entry into the Hall of Fame after only receiving eight of the 12 votes needed from the 16-member Golden Era Committee.

Minoso made his major league debut with Cleveland in 1949 and was dealt to Chicago in a three-team trade two years later. He made his White Sox debut on May 1, 1951, and homered in his first plate appearance against Yankees right-hander Vic Raschi.

Minoso continued to stay active with the White Sox in retirement, and in 2003, played in a game with the St. Paul Saints. Then 77, he became the first player to play professional baseball in seven decades.

A look back at his life through photos:

Autograph seekers crowd around Minnie Minoso.
Autograph seekers crowd around Minnie Minoso.
In a March 9, 1957 file photo, Chicago White Sox outfielder Minnie Minoso poses in batting position at Al Lopez Field in Tampa, Fla. | AP Photo, File
In a March 9, 1957 file photo, Chicago White Sox outfielder Minnie Minoso poses in batting position at Al Lopez Field in Tampa, Fla. | AP Photo, File
In a Aug. 24, 2013 file photo, former Negro Leaguer and Chicago White Sox player Minnie Minoso stands during the national anthem before a game between the White Sox and the Rangers. | AP Photo/David Banks, File
In a Aug. 24, 2013 file photo, former Negro Leaguer and Chicago White Sox player Minnie Minoso stands during the national anthem before a game between the White Sox and the Rangers. | AP Photo/David Banks, File
Left to right, Former Chicago White Sox players Luis Aparicio, Billy Pierce, Minnie Minoso and Harold Baines walk on the field with the World Series Trophy during ceremonies before the White Sox game against the Cleveland Indians on, April 5, 2006 in Chic
Left to right, Former Chicago White Sox players Luis Aparicio, Billy Pierce, Minnie Minoso and Harold Baines walk on the field with the World Series Trophy during ceremonies before the White Sox game against the Cleveland Indians on, April 5, 2006 in Chicago. | AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh

Minnie Minoso participates in the sculpture’s unveiling before throwing out the ceremonial first fitch at U.S. Cellular Field before the game between the White Sox and Detroit Tigers on Sept. 19, 2004. The Chicago White Sox unveiled a life-sized sculpture
Minnie Minoso participates in the sculpture’s unveiling before throwing out the ceremonial first fitch at U.S. Cellular Field before the game between the White Sox and Detroit Tigers on Sept. 19, 2004. The Chicago White Sox unveiled a life-sized sculpture of franchise legend Minnie Minoso to honor his role in the club’s century-long history. | AP Photo/ Nam Y. Huh
Minnie Minoso revisits Comiskey Park with his son, Orestes, Jr., in 1976.
Minnie Minoso revisits Comiskey Park with his son, Orestes, Jr., in 1976.

Minnie Minoso on opening day of SoxFest 2015. | Richard A. Chapman/Sun-Times
Minnie Minoso on opening day of SoxFest 2015. | Richard A. Chapman/Sun-Times
Minnie Minoso throws out the ceremonial first pitch before the game between Chicago White Sox and Detroit Tigers on Sept. 19, 2004. | AP Photo/ Nam Y. Huh
Minnie Minoso throws out the ceremonial first pitch before the game between Chicago White Sox and Detroit Tigers on Sept. 19, 2004. | AP Photo/ Nam Y. Huh
Minnie Minoso prepares to swing at a pitch, as he plays for the St. Paul Saints against Gary at Midway Stadium on Wednesday, July 16, 2003, in St. Paul, Minn. Minoso, 77, became the first player to play professional baseball in seven decades. He was in th
Minnie Minoso prepares to swing at a pitch, as he plays for the St. Paul Saints against Gary at Midway Stadium on Wednesday, July 16, 2003, in St. Paul, Minn. Minoso, 77, became the first player to play professional baseball in seven decades. He was in the lineup as St. Paul’s designated hitter, as part of the team’s annual Negro League tribute, and walked in the first inning. | AP Photo/Star Tribune, Ramin Rahimian

Hall of Famer and MLB Executive Vice President of Baseball Development Frank Robinson, Frank Thomas, and Minnie Minoso made an announcement in April 2013 that the seventh annual Civil Rights game will play in Chicago for the first time. | Al Podgorski~Chi
Hall of Famer and MLB Executive Vice President of Baseball Development Frank Robinson, Frank Thomas, and Minnie Minoso made an announcement in April 2013 that the seventh annual Civil Rights game will play in Chicago for the first time. | Al Podgorski~Chicago Sun-Times
Minnie Minoso gives Gordie Howe a hug on Oct. 3, 1997, in Auburn Hills, Mich., after Howe tied Minoso’s record for playing in professional sports in six decades. Howe, 69, played one shift for the Detroit Vipers in their game against the Kansas City Blade
Minnie Minoso gives Gordie Howe a hug on Oct. 3, 1997, in Auburn Hills, Mich., after Howe tied Minoso’s record for playing in professional sports in six decades. Howe, 69, played one shift for the Detroit Vipers in their game against the Kansas City Blades. | AP Photo/Jeff Kowalsky

Minnie Minoso, teaches children baseball techniques at the Major League Baseball Players Alumni Association’s Legends for Youth Clinic, at Triton College in River Grove, on June 27, 2009. | File photo
Minnie Minoso, teaches children baseball techniques at the Major League Baseball Players Alumni Association’s Legends for Youth Clinic, at Triton College in River Grove, on June 27, 2009. | File photo
White Sox legend Minnie Minoso signs autographs prior to the Sox’ home opener against the Detroit Tigers in 2001. There is some question about his age but the White Sox say he was 92. | AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File
White Sox legend Minnie Minoso signs autographs prior to the Sox’ home opener against the Detroit Tigers in 2001. There is some question about his age but the White Sox say he was 92. | AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File

CONTRIBUTING: ASSOCIATED PRESS