LETTERS: Sanctuary city ‘the best choice’ for Chicago

SHARE LETTERS: Sanctuary city ‘the best choice’ for Chicago
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The Chicago skyline | file photo

With Chicago being such a diverse city, I think a sanctuary city is the best choice. Not only do a lot of immigrants play very important roles for Chicago, they are the least of our city’s worries.

There is so much violence, drugs and crime out there, and people think a hard-working person who came to this country illegally for a better life is the problem?

As a Chicagoan, I support sanctuary cities. People should worry about other problems in society.

Maria Plascencia, Cicero

SEND LETTERS TO: letters@suntimes.com. Please include your neighborhood or hometown and a phone number for verification purposes.

Soda tax is last straw

Lawsuits here, lawsuits there, lawsuits are everywhere! The Cook County sweetened beverage tax is about two weeks old and already Walgreens and McDonalds are being sued for … 12 cents? People are officially losing their minds.

This is what our lawmakers have done to their constituents, turned them into grumpy grousers who sue first and think later. Humans are imperfect — we make mistakes. But, when you push a person to the edge of a cliff, he will fight back or give in and jump. There’s not much of an option.

Scot Sinclair, Third Lake

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