First Chinook from shore: Pull of fall shoreline fishing for kings described through a first one

Terry Benjamin caught his first shoreline Chinook to earn Fish of the Week in an account nicely described by netter Mark Bestvina.

SHARE First Chinook from shore: Pull of fall shoreline fishing for kings described through a first one
Terry Benjamin with his first shoreline fall Chinook. Provided by Mark Bestvina

Terry Benjamin with his first shoreline fall Chinook.

Provided by Mark Bestvina

This fall feels like a good one for anglers catching their first shoreline Chinook.

Take Terry Benjamin of Prospect Heights, nominated by his neighbor/co-worker/fishing buddy Mark Bestvina.

On Sept. 10, they were pier fishing around Waukegan when Benjamin caught his first salmon.

“I did the netting and took the picture, it was quite a thrill to land the fish,” Bestvina emailed. “I’ve been fishing the lakefront for 40-plus years and I’ve seen the good years and the bad.”

The 15-pound-plus king was caught around 10 p.m. An hour later, Bestvina caught a 12-pound king.

“I had the biggest smile on my face while we drove home,” he emailed. “We had to work the next day and got to bed around 2 a.m. Our butts were dragging at work the next day (7 a.m. start).”

That captures the pull of fall shoreline Chinook.

FOTW, the celebration of big fish and their stories (the stories matter, as this one shows) around Chicago fishing, runs Wednesdays in the paper Sun-Times. The online posting here at https://chicago.suntimes.com/outdoors goes up at varied days of the week, depending on what is going on the wide world of the outdoors.

To make submissions, email (BowmanOutside@gmail.com) or contact me on Facebook (Dale Bowman), Twitter (@BowmanOutside) or Instagram (@BowmanOutside).

The Latest
The stretch east from the north branch of the Chicago River has long been known as Little India. The diverse West Ridge strip has become home for many and is still evolving.
Illinois Attorney General Kwame Raoul’s office confirmed they were reviewing an independent report that had delved into Brave Space Alliance’s finances.
“Everything in this world needs transportation,” said Maggie Selagea, who got into trucking when the construction business she and her husband owned collapsed in the 2008 recession. “If this industry stops, that means that the world will stop.”
Women are more likely to develop Alzheimer’s and to be caregivers for those living with the disease.
He was found unresponsive in the 100 block of West 112th Street, police said.