Snow warning: Chicago expected to get 2 to 5 inches of snow by Sunday morning

A winter weather advisory in effect from Saturday night through 9 a.m. Sunday also forecasts a sharp drop in temperatures and wind-chill readings in the single digits.

SHARE Snow warning: Chicago expected to get 2 to 5 inches of snow by Sunday morning
Guy Massey and Kristen Massey hold hands while walking through the Lakefront Trail near Montrose Beach after a snowstorm earlier this month. Another round of snow is expected to start Saturday night.

Guy Massey and Kristen Massey hold hands while walking through the Lakefront Trail near Montrose Beach after a snowstorm earlier this month. Another round of snow is expected to start Saturday night.

Tyler LaRiviere/Sun-Times

The Chicago area could see up to 5 inches of snow between Saturday night and Sunday morning, according to a winter weather advisory from the National Weather Service.

The advisory, which covers northeastern Illinois and northwestern Indiana, is in effect from 9 p.m. Saturday through 9 a.m. Sunday.

The storm could bring 2-5 inches of snow, forecasters said. Lake and Porter counties in Indiana could see even more due to lake effect snow.

The snow is expected to taper off by 9 a.m. Sunday, but wind-chill readings could remain in the single digits.

Temperatures are expected to drop from 29 degrees to about 15 degrees Saturday night, with winds gusting to round 15 miles an hour, according to the weather service.

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