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Tina Sfondeles

Chief Political Reporter

Tina Sfondeles is the chief political reporter, covering all levels of government and politics with a special focus on the Illinois General Assembly, Gov. J.B. Pritzker’s administration and statewide and federal elections. Sfondeles spent much of the pandemic in Washington, D.C. — covering the White House and co-authoring the West Wing Playbook for Politico. She also covered the White House and Democratic politics and policy as a politics correspondent for Insider. Sfondeles joined the Sun-Times in 2007, covering politics, transportation, crime and sports — and returned to the newspaper in 2022.

Some major donors signaled their distress about Biden staying in the race by declining to write more checks or host events. That concern dissolved within hours of Harris becoming the presumptive Democratic 2024 nominee, with no rival coming forward.
Gov. J.B. Pritzker, who had been on short lists as a potential replacement for President Joe Biden, said Monday morning he had spoken to Harris and told her the president’s decision “came as a genuine surprise.”
Some Democrats are staying mum, with just weeks to go before the Democratic National Convention kicks off in Chicago next month.
In uncharacteristically hushed tones during a speech that later pivoted to his populist agenda, Trump gave an account of the shooting which he said “you will never hear from me a second time because it’s actually too painful to tell.”
The state’s super-minority Republicans are leaving the GOP National Convention energized, and with a lot of confidence.
Vance went heavy on mentions of Pennsylvania, Michigan and Ohio — and his humble Appalachian roots as documented in ‘Hillbilly Elegy’ — on the third night of the Republican National Convention.
Salvi, who officially becomes the face of the state party on Friday, called on Illinois Republicans to set aside differences “to usher in a new era of Republican victories here in Illinois.”
Former President Donald Trump took his seat inside the arena for the final two hours of the Republican National Convention program — still wearing a bandage on his right ear from Saturday’s assassination attempt at a Pennsylvania rally. He watched, and smiled often, as his former rivals pledged their support.
Meanwhile, a company owned by Donald Trump is now selling $299 sneakers showing an image of his bloodied face as he pumps his fist in the air, as he did after surviving an assassination attempt in Pennsylvania.