Jam Productions enters partnership with Los Angeles-based SaveLive

“It has been obvious that for Jam’s business to grow, it needed to be part of a network, something larger with more locations,” said Jam co-founder Jerry Mickelson.

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Jerry Mickelson, co-founder of Jam Productions, at The Riviera Theatre, 4746 N. Racine Ave., where an extensive restoration is underway.

Jerry Mickelson, co-founder of Jam Productions, is photographed at The Riviera Theatre earlier this year.

Anthony Vazquez / Sun-Times

Jam Productions, the iconic Chicago-based concert promoter, has entered into partnership with Los Angeles-based SaveLive, it was announced Thursday.

Jam, founded by Jerry Mickelson and Arny Granat in 1972, is celebrating its 50th years as as the Midwest region’s largest concert promoters/producers and one of the largest independent producers of live music in the country. Granat and Jam parted ways in 2019.

The SaveLive investment group is helmed by CEO Marc Geiger.

“It has been obvious that for Jam’s business to grow, it needed to be part of a network, something larger with more locations, data and intelligence analytics as well as booking leverage,” Mickelson said in a statement. “Over the years I considered all the bigger players but there wasn’t a good fit in terms of how we wanted to operate and compete. ... It’s time to announce Jam 2.0 with my new partners, Marc Geiger, John Fogelman, and SaveLive.”

According to one report, Mickelson will retain control of operational decisions for Jam under the new partnership agreement.

“It’s exciting to reinvent Jam by aligning with a national company outside of our comfort zone and built differently than ours,” Mickelson said.

Jam currently operates some of Chicago’s most venerable music venues including The Riv, The Vic and the Park West.

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